Debbie Hewitt MBE set to become the FA’s first chairwoman


Debbie Hewitt MBE set to become the FA’s first chairwoman and will take up the role 14 months after Greg Clarke’s resignation for his racist, homophobic and sexist gaffes

  • Debbie Hewitt MBE is set to become the Football Association’s first chairwoman
  • A seven-member panel picked Hewitt after considering non-executive career
  • Hewitt’s career spanned over 15 years in listed, private equity-backed and privately owned companies, across many different sectors
  • Set to be permanent successor to Greg Clarke, who resigned last November


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Debbie Hewitt MBE is set to become the Football Association’s first chairwoman after receiving a unanimous nomination from the FA Board.

A seven-member selection panel led by independent non-executive FA director Kate Tinsley picked Hewitt after considering her extensive non-executive career spanning over 15 years in listed, private equity-backed and privately owned companies, across many different sectors.

‘The panel were in full agreement that she has the outstanding chair and governance expertise, across an extensive range of business sectors, as well as the proven leadership qualities and character required for the role,’ said an FA statement.

Debbie Hewitt MBE is set to become the Football Association's first chairwoman

Debbie Hewitt MBE is set to become the Football Association’s first chairwoman

Hewitt, whose appointment is subject to ratification by the FA Council, will succeed the interim FA chair, Peter McCormick OBE, from January 2022.

She is set to be a permanent successor to Greg Clarke, who resigned last November after making a series of offensive remarks during an appearance before MPs on the Digital, Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) committee.

Hewitt is currently the non-executive chair of Visa Europe, The Restaurant Group plc, BGL Group and White Stuff.

She will step down from The Restaurant Group, which includes chains such as Wagamama and Frankie and Benny’s, after six years in the role when she joins the FA in January.

‘I’m delighted to be nominated for the role of non-executive chair of The Football Association,’ said Hewitt, who was awarded an MBE in 2011 for services to business and the public sector.

‘As the events in recent months have shown, this is a significant moment in time for English football, with a clear purpose for all stakeholders to secure the long-term health of the game at all levels.

She is set to be a permanent successor to Greg Clarke, who resigned last November after making a series of offensive remarks during an appearance before MPs on DCMS committee

She is set to be a permanent successor to Greg Clarke, who resigned last November after making a series of offensive remarks during an appearance before MPs on DCMS committee

She is set to be a permanent successor to Greg Clarke, who resigned last November after making a series of offensive remarks during an appearance before MPs on DCMS committee

‘I’ve been passionate about football from a very young age and I’m excited by the opportunity to play my part in shaping the future of something that means so much to so many.

‘I’m looking forward to working alongside our CEO Mark Bullingham and the team across Wembley Stadium and St George’s Park, and relish the opportunity to chair an organisation that has the potential to be a very positive force for good throughout the game and across society.’

The FA Council will be asked to formally ratify the appointment at its next meeting on July 22, with McCormick remaining in position as interim chair until Hewitt officially starts next year.

Hewitt will succeed the interim FA chair, Peter McCormick OBE, from January 2022

Hewitt will succeed the interim FA chair, Peter McCormick OBE, from January 2022

Hewitt will succeed the interim FA chair, Peter McCormick OBE, from January 2022

‘This is an excellent appointment for the FA and English football in general. Debbie was the outstanding candidate from a talented and experienced field,’ said Tinsley.

‘She immediately demonstrated her passion and ability to positively influence the direction of the FA on a domestic and global stage, providing strong and principled leadership along the way.’ 

Clarke quit as FA chairman following a disastrous parliamentary appearance in which he made reference to ‘coloured footballers’ among a host of other offensive gaffes last year. 

In his resignation statement Clarke admitted that comments in which he also stereotyped south Asians and described homosexuality as a ‘life choice’ were ‘unacceptable,’ but claimed to have been considering the FA for some time. 

In an extraordinary appearance via video link in front of the Department for Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee Clarke used the phrase ‘coloured footballers’ when discussing online racial abuse and claimed that South Asians and Afro-Caribbean people have ‘different career interests’ by citing the make-up of the FA’s IT department. 

He was also criticised for saying a coach had told him that the lack of women’s goalkeepers was due to girls not liking the ball being kicked at them, while Stonewall UK was among those who condemned his suggestion that being gay was a ‘life choice’.

Clarke offered an apology for the ‘coloured’ remark soon afterwards after being prompted to do so by Kevin Brennan MP.



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