New York floral artist Lewis Miller brings his ‘flower flashes’ to UK for the first time


A ‘botanical Banksy’ famous for guerrilla ‘flower flashes’ has brought his stunning street displays to Britain for the first time.

Floral designer Lewis Miller, from New York, usually decorates dreary spots in the bustling city in the early hours with beautiful and brightly coloured bouquets.

But instead of trash cans and hot dog stalls, the American, 47, turned his attention overnight to creating colourful street scenes in London on Monday.

More than 12,000 fresh blooms from Covent Garden Flower Market were used to carpet the iconic Eros statue in Piccadilly Circus, the phone boxes on the south side of Great Windmill Street, and a humble bin at Dray Walk off east London’s Brick Lane.

Floral designer Lewis Miller, from New York, usually decorates dreary spots in New York in the early hours with beautiful bouquets but has turned his attention to London - including at the iconic Eros statue in Piccadilly (pictured)

Floral designer Lewis Miller, from New York, usually decorates dreary spots in New York in the early hours with beautiful bouquets but has turned his attention to London – including at the iconic Eros statue in Piccadilly (pictured)

Mr Miller said he started his displays in 2016 with a 'very simple ambition to create moments of natural beauty in unexpected parts of the city'. Pictured: A series of installations dubbed 'Flower Flashes' at Dray Walk off east London's Brick Lane

Mr Miller said he started his displays in 2016 with a 'very simple ambition to create moments of natural beauty in unexpected parts of the city'. Pictured: A series of installations dubbed 'Flower Flashes' at Dray Walk off east London's Brick Lane

Mr Miller said he started his displays in 2016 with a ‘very simple ambition to create moments of natural beauty in unexpected parts of the city’. Pictured: A series of installations dubbed ‘Flower Flashes’ at Dray Walk off east London’s Brick Lane

More than 12,000 fresh blooms from Covent Garden Flower Market were used to carpet the iconic Eros statue in Piccadilly Circus, the phone boxes on the south side of Great Windmill Street (pictured), and Dray Walk off east London's Brick Lane

More than 12,000 fresh blooms from Covent Garden Flower Market were used to carpet the iconic Eros statue in Piccadilly Circus, the phone boxes on the south side of Great Windmill Street (pictured), and Dray Walk off east London's Brick Lane

More than 12,000 fresh blooms from Covent Garden Flower Market were used to carpet the iconic Eros statue in Piccadilly Circus, the phone boxes on the south side of Great Windmill Street (pictured), and Dray Walk off east London’s Brick Lane

Passers-by are encouraged to take flowers they fancy from the ‘interactive displays’ with Mr Miller wondering whether how quick Brits would be to to help themselves.

The street artist said: ‘This is the first time I’ve created flower flashes outside my beloved New York and it’s a fascinating social experiment to see how Londoners react to them.

‘In New York, people flock to take the flowers. Will cultural stereotypes prevail and Londoners hang back and be more reserved?’ 

Mr Miller said he started his displays in 2016 with a ‘very simple ambition to create moments of natural beauty in unexpected parts of the city’. 

He said: ‘Getting the opportunity to “lash” such an iconic landmark as Eros is a career highlight – next stop Buckingham Palace!’

Mr Miller teamed up with British florist to the stars Simon Lycett, 54, for the surprise street art.

Mr Lycett, who did the floristry for Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank’s wedding reception in 2018, while Rob Van Helden created the church flowers, has slammed Boris Johnson for ‘abandoning’ the events industry during the Covid crisis. 

Mr Miller (pictured), known as the 'botanical Banksy', is famous for guerrilla 'flower flashes'. Pictured: A brightly coloured floral display at Windmill Street as part of a series of installations in London

Mr Miller (pictured), known as the 'botanical Banksy', is famous for guerrilla 'flower flashes'. Pictured: A brightly coloured floral display at Windmill Street as part of a series of installations in London

Mr Miller (pictured), known as the ‘botanical Banksy’, is famous for guerrilla ‘flower flashes’. Pictured: A brightly coloured floral display at Windmill Street as part of a series of installations in London 

Mr Miller (left) teamed up with British florist Simon Lycett (right), 54, who did the flowers for Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank's wedding reception in 2018, for the surprise street art

Mr Miller (left) teamed up with British florist Simon Lycett (right), 54, who did the flowers for Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank's wedding reception in 2018, for the surprise street art

Mr Miller (left) teamed up with British florist Simon Lycett (right), 54, who did the flowers for Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank’s wedding reception in 2018, for the surprise street art

Not only is it the first time that Mr Miller has come to the UK, but it is also the first time that he has brought his floral displays outside of New York city. Pictured: His floral displays at Windmill Street on Monday

Not only is it the first time that Mr Miller has come to the UK, but it is also the first time that he has brought his floral displays outside of New York city. Pictured: His floral displays at Windmill Street on Monday

Not only is it the first time that Mr Miller has come to the UK, but it is also the first time that he has brought his floral displays outside of New York city. Pictured: His floral displays at Windmill Street on Monday 

Royal florist Mr Lycett (pictured putting the finishing touches to a floral display at Eros in Piccadilly) has slammed Boris Johnson for 'abandoning' the events industry during the Covid crisis

Royal florist Mr Lycett (pictured putting the finishing touches to a floral display at Eros in Piccadilly) has slammed Boris Johnson for 'abandoning' the events industry during the Covid crisis

Royal florist Mr Lycett (pictured putting the finishing touches to a floral display at Eros in Piccadilly) has slammed Boris Johnson for ‘abandoning’ the events industry during the Covid crisis

The pair were recruited by Funnyhowflowersdothat.co.uk, an initiative to promote blooms by The Flower Council of Holland.

Organisers say that flowers ‘become a potent symbol of hope and connection’ during the pandemic.

In the autumn, supermarket Morrisons doubled its in-store florists to 300 to provide bespoke bouquets for its customers.

Google data had found flowers to be one of the most popular online purchases by Brits during lockdown with online searches up 277 per cent.

The Flower Council’s UK manager Chanel de Kock said: ‘Our ‘We Need More Flowers’ campaign seeks to remind people how flowers are central to so many of life’s important moments.

‘We have long admired Lewis’s work from across the pond and now seemed like the perfect opportunity to bring his unique style of guerrilla floral street art to London to celebrate the city opening up.’ 

Mr Miller and Mr Lycett (both pictured) were recruited by Funnyhowflowersdothat.co.uk , an initiative to promote blooms by The Flower Council of Holland

Mr Miller and Mr Lycett (both pictured) were recruited by Funnyhowflowersdothat.co.uk , an initiative to promote blooms by The Flower Council of Holland

Mr Miller and Mr Lycett (both pictured) were recruited by Funnyhowflowersdothat.co.uk , an initiative to promote blooms by The Flower Council of Holland

Passers-by are encouraged to take flowers they fancy from the 'interactive displays' with Mr Miller wondering whether how quick Brits would be to to help themselves. Pictured: Chanel de Kock looks at a floral display on Windmill Street

Passers-by are encouraged to take flowers they fancy from the 'interactive displays' with Mr Miller wondering whether how quick Brits would be to to help themselves. Pictured: Chanel de Kock looks at a floral display on Windmill Street

Passers-by are encouraged to take flowers they fancy from the ‘interactive displays’ with Mr Miller wondering whether how quick Brits would be to to help themselves. Pictured: Chanel de Kock looks at a floral display on Windmill Street

Simon Lycett (pictured) puts the finishing touches to a floral display at Eros in Piccadilly as a series of installations dubbed 'Flower Flashes'

Simon Lycett (pictured) puts the finishing touches to a floral display at Eros in Piccadilly as a series of installations dubbed 'Flower Flashes'

Simon Lycett (pictured) puts the finishing touches to a floral display at Eros in Piccadilly as a series of installations dubbed ‘Flower Flashes’



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