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See shocking pictures of animals being saved before drowning in NSW and Sydney floods

Rescue and emergency services are racing against the tide to save animals that have been swept away by rising flood waters.

Rescue dogs, drowning cows, waterlogged birds, cramped horses and a lost wallaby have been pulled from the storm in New South Wales. 

Pictures showed a sad wallaby on the back of a ute, dogs in cages on a boat and a cow stuck in sand on a beach as they once in a 100-year weather event hit Australia.  

NSW SES volunteers launched a flood boat and ark angel rafts to perform a rescue of 20 dogs from a Western Sydney property on Monday morning (pictured)

NSW SES volunteers launched a flood boat and ark angel rafts to perform a rescue of 20 dogs from a Western Sydney property on Monday morning (pictured)

PREPARING PETS FOR FLOODING 

Make sure pets ID tags and registration is up to date

Join community and animal FB groups

Give pets to family or friends who are not in affected areas if possible 

Keep documentation in a sealed folder 

Have a picture of your pet with you  

Do not leave your animals behind if possible

Transport pets in suitable carriers 

If you have to leave them at home, shut them inside an upstairs room with supplies of food and water

Leave notices on external doors notifying that there are pets inside

 RSPCA NSW

Wildlife rescue service WIRES has asked Good Samaritans to care for animals only if safe to do so, while the RSPCA wants residents in flood-affected areas to prepare to move their pets in an emergency. 

NSW SES volunteers launched a flood boat and ark angel rafts to perform a rescue of 20 dogs from a Western Sydney property on Monday morning.

The mammoth effort included crating the dogs before transporting across flood waters on a makeshift float.

The pups all ended up safe and sound on dry land.

SES says fur parents should never leave pets behind if they are evacuating or escaping a flood, and they should be transported appropriately.

‘Your pets are reliant on you during floods,’ said SES on its Floodsafe website.

‘If you are going to an evacuation centre, make sure they cater for pets or find somewhere to go outside of the flood area which does (family or friends).’ 

The RSPCA also advises preparing ahead before a flooding emergency to keep pets safe.

‘Before flooding occurs, have a current picture of your pet and a picture of you with your pet,’ the RSPCA told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘Ensure your pet is vaccinated, microchipped and registered with your council. Registration could determine whether or not you are reunited with your pet after being separated.’

The animal body recommended owners stay connected with Facebook community grounds and pages such as RSPCA NSW Pet Reunite.

The mammoth rescue effort included crating the dogs before transporting across flood waters on a makeshift float

The mammoth rescue effort included crating the dogs before transporting across flood waters on a makeshift float

The mammoth rescue effort included crating the dogs before transporting across flood waters on a makeshift float

When Richard Gretch rescued a scared Wallaby during the floods on Monday, he put it in the care of his best friend, local keeper Paul Zammit. 

Mr Zammit’s property in the west of Sydney was inundated with flood waters, leaving his hundreds of birds and mammals at risk.

‘All of the animals survived, but they are soaked,’ he said. 

Several western suburbs in the Hawkesbury-Nepean Valley have been forced to evacuate as river levels and floodwaters continue to rise.

A Wallaby owned by local keeper Paul Zammit is seen on the back of a ute in McGrath's Hill after being rescued by Paul's best friend Richard Gretch on March 22

A Wallaby owned by local keeper Paul Zammit is seen on the back of a ute in McGrath's Hill after being rescued by Paul's best friend Richard Gretch on March 22

A Wallaby owned by local keeper Paul Zammit is seen on the back of a ute in McGrath’s Hill after being rescued by Paul’s best friend Richard Gretch on March 22

Local keeper Paul Zammit best friend Richard rescued the wallaby from floodwater in Sydney's west

Local keeper Paul Zammit best friend Richard rescued the wallaby from floodwater in Sydney's west

Local keeper Paul Zammit best friend Richard rescued the wallaby from floodwater in Sydney’s west 

Mr Zammit's property was inundated with flood waters, leaving his hundreds of birds and mammals at risk

Mr Zammit's property was inundated with flood waters, leaving his hundreds of birds and mammals at risk

Mr Zammit’s property was inundated with flood waters, leaving his hundreds of birds and mammals at risk

Mr Zammit also put native birds on the back of his ute, and said all the animals had survived but some were 'soaked'

Mr Zammit also put native birds on the back of his ute, and said all the animals had survived but some were 'soaked'

Mr Zammit also put native birds on the back of his ute, and said all the animals had survived but some were ‘soaked’

Patrons at Old Bar Taree surf club saved a cow after it was washed up on Old Bar beach on Saturday.

The broad forgot to swim between the flags, but was still assisted by six generous and concerned life savers, a local vet and members of the public.  

After being put in a ute, the soaking sow transported safety into a paddock after her adventure in the sea. 

Patrons at Old Bar Taree surf club saved a cow (pictured) after it was washed up on their beach on March 20

Patrons at Old Bar Taree surf club saved a cow (pictured) after it was washed up on their beach on March 20

Patrons at Old Bar Taree surf club saved a cow (pictured) after it was washed up on their beach on March 20

The cow forgot to swim between the flags, but was still assisted by the generous and concerned life savers

The cow forgot to swim between the flags, but was still assisted by the generous and concerned life savers

The cow forgot to swim between the flags, but was still assisted by the generous and concerned life savers 

The soaking sow (pictured) was transported safety to a by the surf club members paddock after her adventure in the sea

The soaking sow (pictured) was transported safety to a by the surf club members paddock after her adventure in the sea

The soaking sow (pictured) was transported safety to a by the surf club members paddock after her adventure in the sea 

A white cow (pictured) was seen walking though a flooded paddock inu00A0Tambourine Mountain Floods

A white cow (pictured) was seen walking though a flooded paddock inu00A0Tambourine Mountain Floods

A white cow (pictured) was seen walking though a flooded paddock in Tambourine Mountain Floods

Farmers on Grange Road in Schofield tend to the stock due to heavy rain in Sydney, Saturday, March 20

Farmers on Grange Road in Schofield tend to the stock due to heavy rain in Sydney, Saturday, March 20

Farmers on Grange Road in Schofield tend to the stock due to heavy rain in Sydney, Saturday, March 20

A lost and confused duck (pictured) sat on Ross Lane which was closed between Lennox Head and the Pacific Highway on March 22

A lost and confused duck (pictured) sat on Ross Lane which was closed between Lennox Head and the Pacific Highway on March 22

A lost and confused duck (pictured) sat on Ross Lane which was closed between Lennox Head and the Pacific Highway on March 22

Former jockey Melinda Turner managed to save five of her horses at Fernbank Creek on Saturday after being forced to evacuate.

She lost her fences, garages, stables and sheds but was able to swim her animals to the veranda of her house.

At Sunday 10am the water had dropped enough to get them back to safety at Ms Turner’s mothers training facility.    

Former jockey Melinda Turner managed to save five of her horses (pictured) at Fernbank Creek on Saturday after being forced to evacuate

Former jockey Melinda Turner managed to save five of her horses (pictured) at Fernbank Creek on Saturday after being forced to evacuate

Former jockey Melinda Turner managed to save five of her horses (pictured) at Fernbank Creek on Saturday after being forced to evacuate

She lost her fences, garages, stables and sheds but Ms Turner managed to swim her animals to the veranda of her house (pictured)

She lost her fences, garages, stables and sheds but Ms Turner managed to swim her animals to the veranda of her house (pictured)

 She lost her fences, garages, stables and sheds but Ms Turner managed to swim her animals to the veranda of her house (pictured)

A Sunshine Coast snake catcher has warned people in rainy areas that snakes and other wildlife seek refuge and higher ground during floods to try and keep dry. 

‘Higher ground and a dry spot to rest can often mean snakes will come up around your home and balcony’s, so keep an eye out for snakes in this weather.

‘If you see a snake or any wildlife in trouble and requiring assistance please [a snake catcher] or your local animal rescue group.’

A Brown Tree snake sought a dry spot in someone’s BBQ, leading them to call the snake catchers for help removing it. 

A Brown Tree snake (pictured) found a dry spot out of the rain and off the ground in someones BBQ on the sunshine coast

A Brown Tree snake (pictured) found a dry spot out of the rain and off the ground in someones BBQ on the sunshine coast

A Brown Tree snake (pictured) found a dry spot out of the rain and off the ground in someones BBQ on the sunshine coast 

A Sunshine Coast snake catcher has warned snakes and other wildlife seek refuge and higher ground during floods to try and keep dry

A Sunshine Coast snake catcher has warned snakes and other wildlife seek refuge and higher ground during floods to try and keep dry

A Sunshine Coast snake catcher has warned snakes and other wildlife seek refuge and higher ground during floods to try and keep dry

WHAT TO DO IF YOU FIND AN BIRD IN FLOODWATER 

Birds are the most impacted by floods as they become waterlogged and unable to fly

Pick the bird up gently by wrapping them in a small towel or soft cloth with no loose threads

Take them inside and place in a ventilated box high enough for the bird to stand

Let the bird warm up and dry out in peace

Once the weather has settled and the bird has dried out, it can be taken back outside for release. 

Open the box slowly and move back and the bird should fly away. 

If it does not fly away, call WIRES for further advice. 

Do not feed the bird

Call WIRES on 1300 094 737 for advice

 WIRES


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bourbiza

Bourbiza Mohamed. Writer and Political Discourse Analysis.

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