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Possum spots a snake hiding on a family’s front veranda – so can you spot the sneaky serpent?

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Possum spots a perfectly camouflaged seven-foot snake sizing it up as a tasty meal – but can you see the sneaky serpent?

  • A possum was left on edge after spotting a camouflaged snake just metres away
  • An expert snake catcher said the python was sizing up the possum as next meal
  • As temperatures and humidity increase over summer, snake sightings on the rise

A possum quite possibly had the fright of its life after spotting a camouflaged snake ready to pounce just metres away on a family’s front veranda.

Snake Catchers Brisbane and Gold Coast uploaded the image to its Facebook page, after staff were recently called out to a home in Sherwood, south-west of Brisbane’s CBD. 

The photos show a carpet python comfortably perched and hidden from view on the veranda, leaving the possum every reason to feel threatened.

The possum (pictured above) was nervous after spotting a snake ready to pounce on the deck below

The possum (pictured above) was nervous after spotting a snake ready to pounce on the deck below 

The python (circled above in red) had the possum on edge as it patiently waited to strike

The python (circled above in red) had the possum on edge as it patiently waited to strike

The python (circled above in red) had the possum on edge as it patiently waited to strike

Snake catcher Jaedon Lunt, who collected the serpent, said it was ‘highly probable’ the seven-foot python was sizing up the possum as its next meal.

In May last year, experienced snake catcher Stuart McKenzie was called out to a home on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast after reports of a massive carpet python slithering on a suburban roof.

On arrival, he kept a safe distance after seeing the python was feasting on a large ring-tail possum.

‘When I arrived it was dangling there from the roof with the possum in its mouth,’ he told 7News.

‘It took about an hour to eat it completely, so I just sat with the residents while we watched and waited for it (snake) to be done with its meal.

‘The people at the home were very good about it and were pretty intrigued by the whole thing.’

Snake catcher Jaedon Lunt (pictured above) who collected the serpent, said it was 'highly probable' the seven-foot python was sizing up the possum as its next meal

Snake catcher Jaedon Lunt (pictured above) who collected the serpent, said it was 'highly probable' the seven-foot python was sizing up the possum as its next meal

Snake catcher Jaedon Lunt (pictured above) who collected the serpent, said it was ‘highly probable’ the seven-foot python was sizing up the possum as its next meal

Everything you need to know about snakes in Australia

*Snakes are ectothermic (cold-blooded) and rely on the external environment to regulate their body temperature – this is why snakes and other reptiles bask in the sun

*Rely on sight, smell, and vibrations, smell is their strongest sense. Flicking out their tongue, they are able to taste particles in the air

*Australia is home to over 190 species of snakes, 25 of which are toxic to humans and 20 of those are among the most venomous in the world

*Spring is usually the most active month for snakes, when males are actively seeking females to mate

*Snakes have no eyelids and most are immune to their own venom

*The king cobra is the longest and most venomous snake in the world, and eats other snakes, including other king cobras

Source: Australian Geographic 

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bourbiza

Bourbiza Mohamed. Writer and Political Discourse Analysis.

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